Balanced between modern metropolises of sprawling train networks to colorful villages guarding serene temples, Japan is a treasure trove of cities, towns, and attractions that cannot be missed, despite being roughly the size of the US state of California.

Paramount to any trip to Japan is the capital of Tokyo, a modern marvel of stunning skyscrapers, packed shopping streets, stacked restaurants, and a super efficient train system, while also holding a variety of historical temples and architecture. Tokyo alone could be the bulk of your trip to Japan, but there's much, much more to see.

Grab a Rail Pass to enjoy the country's high speed rail network (Shinkansen) down south to Japan's more historical and scenic cities, including Nagoya, Kyoto, Osaka and Hiroshima, as well as the rural and friendly village of Hakone, wh...ere you can see the towering Mt Fuji.

Each of these cities are a must see, especially the charming city of Kyoto, from which you can climb through over 10,000 gates of the Fushimi Inari-taisha shrine or hike along the Arashiyama Bamboo Grove.

A trip north will lead you to the Sendai, home to the stunning Tanabata Festival, an event that attracts more than 2 million participants. Continue to the port town of Aomori and take a ferry to the scenic northern island of Hokkaido.

In winter, this island becomes a stunning wonderland and host to the amazing Sapporo Snow Festival, filled with intricate and colorful ice and snow sculptures. In contrast, summer offers colorful fields of flowers across the island, making it a perfect place for a scenic drive.
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Japan Travel FAQ

  • Do I need a visa?

    Japan has agreements with 60 countries that exempt these citizens from having to apply for a visa to enter Japan, including: All European Union citizens
    Andorra
    Australia
    Argentina
    Bahamas
    Barbados
    Brunei (15 days)
    Canada
    Chile
    Costa Rica
    Dominican Republic
    El Salvador
    Guatemala
    Honduras
    Hong Kong
    Iceland
    Israel
    Lesotho
    Liechtenstein
    Macau
    Macedonia
    Malaysia
    Mauritius
    Mexico
    Monaco
    New Zealand
    Norway
    San Marino
    Serbia
    Singapore
    South Korea
    Suriname
    Switzerland
    Taiwan
    Thailand (15 days)
    Tunisia
    Turkey
    United States

    Nationalities of all other countries require a visa.

  • What can I bring through Customs?

    Baggage or accompanying items arriving separately (within six months after either entry to or exit from Japan), which are accepted as for personal use only, are duty-free within the restricted quantity as specified by the customs regulations. For more details, please refer to Japan's Official Custom Rules.

  • Can I use my credit cards? What is the best way to carry money in Japan: Travelers Checks, cash or credit cards?

    Although most stores and restaurants will accept VISA, MasterCard and American Express cards, travelers should keep in mind that there are smaller shops that may not have merchant account capabilities.

    More than 26,000 Post Office ATMs exist at various locations throughout Japan, and stickers indicate whether a Post Office has an ATM machine. Cirrus, Plus, Maestro and Visa Electron networks are accepted, as are Visa, MasterCard, American Express and Diners Club credit cards.

    Japan has one of the lowest crime rates in the world, so carrying cash is not a real problem. Travelers Checks are also an option, although it is wise to have these available in either Japanese yen, or US dollars. Travelers Checks may not be accepted by establishments other than major hotels and banks, as establishments must have currency exchange capabilities in order to accept these.

  • I don't speak Japanese. Will travel in Japan be difficult?

    Traveling in a country where you don't speak the language can be both challenging and rewarding. But even if you don't speak any Japanese, finding your way around Japan needn't be difficult.

    English is widely spoken throughout the country, particularly in major cities and tourist centers. Public transportation announcements are frequently made in both Japanese and English, and signs generally include decipherable roman characters or an English explanation.

    A comprehensive range of tourist services also provide a helping hand to foreign visitors in Japan.

  • When is peak travel season?

    Visitors to Japan should be aware of the peak times of the year for booking travel and accommodation reservations, which are:

    1. Yearend and during New Year holidays — December 27 to January 4 and adjacent weekends
    2. Golden Week holiday season — April 29 to May 5 and adjacent weekends and
    3. Bon festival season — the week centering on August 15

  • What kinds of accommodations are there in Japan?

    You will find a variety of accommodation styles to suit all tastes and budgets in Japan. If you are looking for western-style lodgings, there are luxury hotels and business hotels.

    If you prefer Japanese-style accommodations, stay at a Ryokan (Japanese-style inn) and Minshuku (private guest-house providing a bed and meals). Most Ryokan offer a free bath in a traditional hot spring, a must for first-time visitors to Japan.

    We recommend the Japanese Inn Group and Youth Hostels for travelers on low budgets. They are networked together so members receive discounted rates (you can purchase a membership at each hostel). Most include comfortable beds, free WiFi, enclosed showers and baths, and some include single or family rooms. If you are a solo traveler, they are a good place to meet other travelers

  • What are geishsa?

    Geisha are women whose profession is to entertain guests in a tatami-matted room at Japanese-style restaurants and other similar establishments. They perform traditional Japanese arts such as dancing, playing the shamisen (a three-stringed Japanese musical instrument), and playing/singing musical accompaniments.

    Geishas can be 18 to 80 years old. An apprentice geisha is called Maiko in Kyoto and Hangyoku in Tokyo. It is believed that there are fewer than 10,000 geisha in Japan today, so certainly, not all Japanese women are geisha.

    Some people can form the wrong impression of a geisha's occupation, because geisha are women while their guests are usually men, but it is true that geisha are purely professional artistes who entertain guests by performing traditional arts.

Japan Tour Reviews

  • colorful Japan

    Just came back from my jurney to Japan. I have to say it was...

    By: Michelle | Sun Sep 24, 2017

  • Hakone Day Trip

    Service was excellent,Thank you Derek. Tourist attractions w...

    By: Tadeas  | Thu Sep 07, 2017

  • Essence of Japan

    This tour is really amazing. My family and I were so happy w...

    By: Daryl | Sun Aug 20, 2017

  • Good Tour, Good Guide!

    I joined this tour with my family. We are all surprised that...

    By: Tawnie | Fri Jul 28, 2017

  • Perfect Experience

    This is the perfect tour. With the transportation and accomm...

    By: Razia | Wed Jul 05, 2017

  • Best of Value

    "I took this tour with my family. The itinerary was good. We...

    By: Tri Nguyen | Tue Jun 06, 2017

  • Had Fun!

    "We visited a lot of attractions during the trip. Thanks to ...

    By: JOSE SUKRI | Sat Jun 03, 2017

  • Great Trip at good price

    This is our first time to Japan. Everything was great. We en...

    By: Preeti Basu | Fri Jun 02, 2017

  • Will go there again

    "Good tour. Next time, I will go with my parents. "

    By: Star Eve Alvarez | Mon May 29, 2017

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